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Emotion Meter Activities

Jessica Ragnio, MSW, LICSW, and Associate Clinical Director at Mightier

Jessica Ragnio, MSW, LICSW, and Associate Clinical Director at Mightier

Published on June 15, 2022 | 2 min read

heart rate meter

Emotions come in all colors and temperatures. If you’re looking for a creative way to explore emotions with your child, try out Mightier’s Emotion Meter (or, if you’re a Mightier family, “The Gizmo”). All emotions are valid and can be felt within our bodies. Here at Mightier we like to emphasize that by giving kids ways to make the connection between their emotions and heart rate. Let’s explore!

The Red Zone

When our heart rate is up it could mean we’re feeling excited, or anxious, or frustrated. Maybe we’re jumping around, or the ice cream truck is driving by, or a sibling just snatched our favorite toy away. There’s no right or wrong here – our heart rate goes up in response to certain emotions or situations.

The Blue Zone

When our heart rate is lower (or resting) it could mean we’re feeling calm, relaxed, or comfortable. Maybe we’re sleeping, or reading a nice story, cuddling with a stuffed animal, or taking deep breaths. Just as there are emotions and actions that get our heart rate up, there are emotions and actions that can bring our heart rate down.

The Mind-Body Connection

The cool thing about emotions and heart rate – they’re connected, and by controlling one you can control the other! Download Mightier’s Emotion Meter, and use the following prompts to explore and experiment with that mind-body connection.

  1. What emotions do you feel when in the blue zone? What about when in the red zone?
  2. What situations put you into the red zone? What situations help you stay in the blue zone?
  3. What activities get your heart rate up into the red zone? What activities get your heart rate back down to the blue zone?
  4. What zone are you in now? What zone are you in before school? What zone are you in after school?

Mightier’s Emotion Meter is flexible, and meant to be used in creative and self-guided ways. Children learn best when given the opportunity to playfully engage, explore, and construct meaning for themselves. There’s no right or wrong way to feel, so giving kids the chance to discover and make sense of their emotional states on their own terms is key.

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