Oppositional Defiant Disorder

Oppositional Defiant Disorder

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The other day he was starting to rage
…I took a loud, deep breath and said “We need to go back to blue.” He did it. He stopped, put the bowl down, and started breathing. Usually it takes being physically held for him to come out of a moment like that.
— Mother of 11 year old boy

What is ODD?

Definition of ODD:

Oppositional defiant disorder [ODD] is a condition in which children display “frequent and persistent pattern of anger, irritability, arguing, defiance or vindictiveness toward you and other authority figures.” The condition must be diagnosed by a medical professional and often coexists with other disorders such as ADHD, anxiety, etc.
Source: Mayo Clinic

Severity

+ Mild

+ Moderate

+ Severe

COMMON SYMPTOMS:

+ Irritable moods

+ Defiant behavior

+ Aggression

+ Outbursts

+ Increased problems at home and school

TREATMENT OPTIONS:

+ Therapy

+ Medication (for those with coexisting disorders)

How do I know if my
child has ODD?

Children with oppositional defiant disorder tend to be emotionally and physically sensitive and extremely reactive. People experience kids with ODD as angry, argumentative, and frequently and intentionally in conflict with everyone around them, including parents and other loved ones. You may notice signs of ODD in your kid, or you may hear about your kid’s ODD behaviors from teachers or other authority figures. Here is a short article from ADDitude magazine on what ODD looks like in children.

Mightier & ODD

 

Living With a Child With ODD

Parenting a kid with ODD can be challenging. They frequently test your boundaries, question your authority, and break the rules. If you have other children, you might have to break up fights on a daily basis. Here are a few strategies and tips that may help:  ...

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Miles’ Story

Before Mightier, the word that Stephanie heard most often from her son, Miles, was “no.” Even if she asked him to do something he enjoyed, he refused. When he wasn’t getting his way, when he felt like he wasn’t being listened to, or when he felt like others were...

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Sam’s Story

Sam, a 7-year-old, has a milder form of ODD than his older brother. His mom, Stephanie, describes him as “the sweetest little kid you’ll ever meet” with a “smile that can melt the world.” You can tell that Sam is upset because his smile disappears. His first years...

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Press

Read our article in PsychCentral on why an ODD diagnosis doesn’t make your child “bad”

Read our featured article in Parentology on why ODD can often make parents feel like it’s their fault.

Read our featured article on Parenting on how a lot of parents can mistake O.D.D. symptoms as bad behavior.